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The Motability Scheme has been running since 1978 to help disabled people with their mobility needs.  In a partnership between the government, charities, banks and motor insurance companies, over three million cars, scooters and powered wheelchairs have been provided by the charity that is registered in the UK, helping disabled people get about.

Cars provided to disabled people and obtained from the Motability Scheme are sometimes referred to as ‘Motability Cars’.

In order to qualify for the Scheme, you need to in receipt of the Disability Living Allowance (DLA) that provides assistance to disabled people towards living costs, which includes care as well as mobility.  Similarly, if you are a war pensioner who has been disabled so that you cannot or have difficulty walking and are entitled to the mobility supplement, you also may be eligible for the Motability Scheme.

Eligibility

The Motability Scheme is open to anyone who qualifies for the Higher Rate Mobility Component of the Disability Living Allowance or War Pensioners’ Mobility Supplement.

Disability Living Allowance

To be eligible for the DLA, you must have walking difficulties or require help with your day-to-day care. (You cannot claim for the first three months of having these needs). You need to expect to have these difficulties for at least the next six months.

You have to be over 16 years of age and your disability needs to be serious enough that you need assistance with day to day tasks like washing, getting dressed, mobility around the home (going to the bathroom for example), eating, cooking a main meal for yourself or communicating your needs. You may need supervision to avoid having accidents or putting others in danger.

If you have mobility needs, then you may qualify for the mobility component of the Disability Living Allowance. You may qualify for this if any of the following apply:

–          your disability is severe enough that even when using whatever aid or equipment to move around, you are unable or virtually unable to walk without difficulty, or at a risk of worsening your condition by trying to walk;

–          you have no feet or legs;

–          you are assessed as 100% disabled due to being blind, or certified as having seriously impaired vision (visual acuity of between 6/60 and3/60 and with complete loss of peripheral visual field no more than ten degrees of central visual field);

–          you are over 80% disabled due to deafness;

–          you are severely mentally impaired with severe behavioural problems;

–          you need assistance from someone when walking outside in unfamiliar places;

A mobility allowance can be claimed for a child from the age three is the child cannot or is almost unable to walk and would be at risk if they were to try.

There are two levels of mobility allowance, the lower rate where you just need guidance outdoors, and the higher level where your disability is more serious. In order to qualify for the Motability Scheme, you need to qualify for the Higher Rate Mobility Component of the Disability Living Allowance.

War Pensioners’ Mobility Supplement

If you are eligible for a War Disablement Pension, and you are unable to walk, you may be entitled to a War Pensioner Mobility Supplement. This is generally paid to War Disablement Pensioners who have had both legs amputated or who are disabled so that they cannot walk. This Mobility Supplement is payable weekly, monthly or annually with a slightly higher rate applicable to officers.

Conclusion

The Mobility Scheme is there to help people who are disabled with getting around. Those eligible for the Higher Rate Mobility Component of the Disability Living Allowance or War Pensioners’ Mobility Supplement may find that they can claim an allowance to use to pay for a vehicle and all its charges, to help them overcome problems with mobility.

If you are looking to use the mobility scheme, Watford Vauxhall dealer, Northern Motors would be delighted to meet with you and discuss your requirements.

Image Credits: Wikipedia 1, 2.